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Self Driving Car

You may have heard the news: An Uber Technologies Inc. autonomous vehicle was involved in an accident in Arizona. A human driver in a Honda CRV turning left at a yellow light hit the self-driving Volvo as it was crossing the intersection. Though the Volvo flipped onto its side after hitting a pole, no serious injuries were reported.

Accident investigators found the human driver to be at fault. The artificially intelligent (AI) vehicle was traveling just under the speed limit, and the employee “behind the wheel” stated he saw the Honda driver but did not have time to react.

Continue reading “Yes, Fully Self-Driving Cars Are Coming To California”

Overtime Facts in California

“In California,  a nonexempt employee 18 years of age or older, shall not be employed more than eight hours in any workday or more than 40 hours in any workweek unless he or she receives one and one-half times his or her regular rate of pay for all hours worked over eight hours in any workday and over 40 hours in the workweek. Eight hours of labor constitutes a day’s work, and employment beyond eight hours in any workday or more than six days in any workweek requires the employee to be compensated for the overtime at not less than:

  1. One and one-half times the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of eight hours up to and including 12 hours in any workday, and for the first eight hours worked on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek; and
  2. Double the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 12 hours in any workday and for all hours worked in excess of eight on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek.”

https://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/FAQ_Overtime.htm

Continue reading “Are you being Short Changed for Your Overtime Pay?”

Cumulative Trauma Injuries

Under California Workers’ Compensation law, cumulative injuries qualify for workers’ compensation benefits even if they occur over a period of time rather than in one incident.  

Basically there are two types of workplace injuries. One is a workplace injury which is generally referred to as a specific injury and the second one is cumulative trauma.

What are Cumulative Trauma Injuries?

Continue reading “Understanding Cumulative Trauma Injuries: California Workers Comp Explained”

Construction Site Accident

The construction industry is one of the most dangerous industries in the United States. Each
year, many thousands of individuals are injured and even killed in construction site accidents. Too many serious injuries are caused by a fall or dropped objects. It is also common for workers to trip over a piece of lumber that is left in an unsafe place. Some of the injuries that occur on construction sites
can result in:

  • Broken and fractured bones
  • Head injuries
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Electrocution
  • Burn injuries
  • Wrongful death

Continue reading “A Construction Site Accident is No Laughing Matter”

Pedestrian Walkway

Regardless of the established rules and regulations for a pedestrian’s right of way, negligent and inattentive drivers are still hitting people walking or crossing our Southern California streets, causing serious and sometimes catastrophic injury. We have all experienced drivers that fail to acknowledge basic rules of the road when they encounter someone walking across a street.

Why Pedestrian Accidents Occur

In California, pedestrians have certain rights, such as; drivers are required to stop for pedestrians at all crosswalks (whether unmarked or marked). Here are the most common factors involved in pedestrian accidents:

Continue reading “What YOU Need to Know about Pedestrian Accidents”

Thanksgiving Dinner Meal Break Rest Break

If your boss violates California rest and meal and state laws, you may be able to sue your employer for not allowing you to have your legal amount of meal or rest breaks. For instance, if your employer denies you a meal break, or does not compensate you for your rest break, they can suffer real consequences.

Under California law, an employee must be given breaks every five hours. You cannot work for more than five hours a day without be given a meal period of at least thirty minutes. If your total work day is only 6 hours in that case a meal break can be waived by both parties.

When you work for more than ten hours, a 2nd meal period of not less than 30 minutes must be allowed. Again, if you are only working a total of 10 hours or less, the 2nd meal period can be waived by mutual consent, as long as you did not waive your first meal break.

Continue reading “What you need to know about Meal and Rest breaks”

Truck Accident

Despite what you may have heard or read, all motor vehicle accidents are not treated equally by the law. A truck accident is defined as vehicle crashes involving 18-wheelers, tractor trailers, semi-trucks and other commercial motor vehicles that cause personal injury and/or property damage.

It was reported by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, “accidents that involved large commercial trucks accounted for 287,000 property damage claims, 77,000 injuries and 4,321 deaths over the course of a single year.” Comparably, medium to large trucks are responsible for a very small segment of the accidents that take place on highways; but their large size causes more serious damage and the accidents are more likely to be catastrophic. Motor vehicles that collide with large trucks see much more damage to their vehicle. Another big difference is in terms of settlements after an accident. The amount of effort and costs associated with investigating and pursuing the remedies in a trucking accident are more complex and more expensive.

Continue reading “Truck Accidents Versus Auto Accidents What You Need to Know”

Wrongful Termination

California is an “at-will employment” state, which means that any employment relationship can be ended without prior notice or warning by the employer or the employee at any time and for any reason.  There is no general requirement that an employer have “good cause” before firing an employee. Nor is the employee entitled to any warnings that the employee’s job is in danger before being fired.

Wrongful Termination Claims

Continue reading “Wrongful Termination in California”

Work Injury

If you are injured or ill on the job, Workers Comp insurance covers medical expenses and a portion of lost wages. Even though the State of California requires employers to carry Workers’ Compensation coverage, not every worker is covered. Here are some examples of those not covered by Workers Comp.

Business Owners and Volunteers

Business owners, from sole proprietors to partners are not covered by their company’s workers’ compensation insurance. Some business owners may elect to receive WP if they pay the premium. As for volunteers, they are not generally considered employees, so they are not eligible for WP. There are some exceptions like- volunteer police officers and firefighters who are requested by a firefighter or police officer to assist in an emergency.

Continue reading “Who Is NOT Covered by Workers Compensation Insurance?”

Motorcycle Accident

Simply- what you do after a motorcycle accident can have a significant impact on your ability to maximize the compensation you receive for your injuries.

What you should do to protect your interests after a Motorcycle Accident

The most important thing to do when you sustain a motorcycle accident injury is to seek medical attention. There is nothing more important than your health and well-being.  Brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, burns, road rash, and disfigurement and amputations are common injuries in motorcycle accidents. It is important to have any injuries documented by the emergency room or hospital staff. If possible, have them document that the injuries were caused by a motorcycle accident.

Continue reading “What Do I Do After a Motorcycle Accident?”

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