Free case evaluation (818) 507 8525
Thanksgiving Dinner Meal Break Rest Break

If your boss violates California rest and meal and state laws, you may be able to sue your employer for not allowing you to have your legal amount of meal or rest breaks. For instance, if your employer denies you a meal break, or does not compensate you for your rest break, they can suffer real consequences.

Under California law, an employee must be given breaks every five hours. You cannot work for more than five hours a day without be given a meal period of at least thirty minutes. If your total work day is only 6 hours in that case a meal break can be waived by both parties.

When you work for more than ten hours, a 2nd meal period of not less than 30 minutes must be allowed. Again, if you are only working a total of 10 hours or less, the 2nd meal period can be waived by mutual consent, as long as you did not waive your first meal break.

Continue reading “What you need to know about Meal and Rest breaks”

Wrongful Termination

California is an “at-will employment” state, which means that any employment relationship can be ended without prior notice or warning by the employer or the employee at any time and for any reason.  There is no general requirement that an employer have “good cause” before firing an employee. Nor is the employee entitled to any warnings that the employee’s job is in danger before being fired.

Wrongful Termination Claims

Continue reading “Wrongful Termination in California”

Disability-accommodation

“The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is federal law that protects disabled employees from being discriminated against in the workplace. Consistent with the ADA, employees with disabil0126ities are permitted under California disability discrimination law to request reasonable accommodations from their employers in order to help them perform their job duties.”

In California, employers are legally bound to provide a disabled employee reasonable accommodations. One stipulation- the cost of this accommodation can not be deemed an undue hardship to the employer.

3 Common Requests workers with disabilities can legally make   Continue reading “Employees with Disabilities- 3 Common Accepted Employer Accommodations”

Misclassification

Many noteworthy class action lawsuits have come down to an employer misclassification of nonexempt employees. Let’s look at the facts.

In the US, generally there are two types of employees- ‘exempt employees’ and ‘non-exempt employees.’ The difference? The most significant differentiation is with the issue of overtime work. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is the federal law that regulates these distinctions. The FLSA states that employers are obligated to pay at least minimum wage for up to 40 hours per week as well as overtime pay. It also specifies that exempt employees are not entitled to overtime pay.

CALIFORNIA LAW

“While California law has more rigorous standards than federal law, federal law still warrants some attention. For one thing, the Department of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE) has indicated that, although there are differences between the state and federal exemption standards, the federal regulations may serve as a guide where there is no conflict.”https://www.calchamber.com/california-employment-law/pages/exempt-nonexempt-employees.aspx
Continue reading “Exempt Employee or Non Exempt Employee That is the question!”

Free Case Evaluation

Please prove you are human by selecting the Heart.

Loading the Art of Law